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Discussion: Bruckner: Symphony No. 9 - Haitink

Posts: 10

Post by sunnydaler January 13, 2014 (1 of 10)
There's a short clip of Scherzo on the following link. It's stiff and measured. Not a good sign.
lso.co.uk/bruckner-sympony-no-9

Post by fausto K January 17, 2014 (2 of 10)
I'm glad to read in Castor's site review that this recording is as good as I hoped. Looking forward to hearing it.

BTW, the timings of the first and third movement of his second recording of B9, from 1981 (released on LP in 1982) are inbetween his first and the latest, although closer to the 1965:

I: 24:16 II: 3:52+6:27 III 25:27

Remarkably, the scherzo is much faster than both the 1965 and the LSO. A stunning recording by all accounts. (if only it would be released on SACD; although it's an earlyish digital recording, the sound is very very good)

Post by BrianE February 23, 2014 (3 of 10)
My original CD of the digital recording made in 1981 and released in 1982 has different movement timings printed.
I: 25.11, II: 10.51, III: 26.28, total 62.30. My CD player adds 3 seconds to each of the first and second movements. This recording appears to be the one in Bernard Haitink The Philips Years, according to timings on Decca's website

I think the analogue recording from 1965 is the one on a Philips Duo release coupled with Symphony No. 1 and the Te Deum. According to Amazon's MP3 track data the timings are I: 23.17, II: 11.14, III: 24.55 which add up to 59.31. This appears to be the recording in the Bernard Haitink The Symphony Edition (Decca website)

I wonder what has happened about any possible recording of Symphony No.7 which was played in concert in June 2012.

Post by fausto K April 5, 2014 (4 of 10)
Not that it matters (for some), but this disc is a Gramophone Editor's Choice in April's edition of the mag. The more I listen to it, the more convincing the reading (and recording) becomes.
The next time I hear this symphony live will be with the Staatskapelle Dresden under Thielemann, in September here in Munich. Thielemann will have to do some heavy lifting to surpass it.

Post by Polarius T April 5, 2014 (5 of 10)
Thanks for the heads-up. May have to check this one out, on the strength of your recommendation.

Happy listening.

Post by fausto K April 5, 2014 (6 of 10)
Polarius T said:

Thanks for the heads-up. May have to check this one out, on the strength of your recommendation.

Happy listening.

You're welcome. Unlike what some (such as the above commenter) think, this reading is anything but "stiff" -- measured yes, but Haitink has a thorough grasp of the long line. The cohesiveness of this interpretation is rarely matched (well, I like his 1981 recording with the Concertgebouw as well). Also the playing of the LSO is magnificent, and the recording is one of the best of LSO I have, with a huge dynamic range - play at high volume!

Post by Lute April 5, 2014 (7 of 10)
I recently picked up a copy of Bruckner: Symphony No. 7 - Haitink. When I first listened to it, I just had to sit down and bask in the glow of this glorious music. Look forward to Haitink's recording of the ninth.

Post by fausto K April 8, 2014 (8 of 10)
I concur entirely with this review by one Peter Reed at Classical Source:
http://www.classicalsource.com/db_control/db_cd_review.php?id=11711

Post by armenian April 9, 2014 (9 of 10)
fausto K said:

I concur entirely with this review by one Peter Reed at Classical Source:
http://www.classicalsource.com/db_control/db_cd_review.php?id=11711

Ok, I am willing to try one more time.

“The more I listen to this wonderful, spaciously recorded performance, the more I am getting from it.”

Referring to this review in your post, and since you have the SACD, would you please comment on “spaciously recorded” aspect of the sound on this SACD, every Barbican recording on LSO live that I buy I promise never again as these are just too dry sounding, has something changed?

Vahe

Post by fausto K April 10, 2014 (10 of 10)
armenian said:

Ok, I am willing to try one more time.

“The more I listen to this wonderful, spaciously recorded performance, the more I am getting from it.”

Referring to this review in your post, and since you have the SACD, would you please comment on “spaciously recorded” aspect of the sound on this SACD, every Barbican recording on LSO live that I buy I promise never again as these are just too dry sounding, has something changed?

Vahe

"spaciously recorded" as in "NOT sounding boxed-in"; as Castor points out, the recording provides 'a sense of an ample acoustic space'. As odd as it may 'sound', one can hardly imagine that this is recorded in the Barbican. Well, for those who regular attend live, imagine that you're seated in the least bad seats, where you can at least see and hear the timpanist and bassists.
If one wants a more spectacularly (and less subtle) sounding recording, one could go for this one:
Bruckner: Symphony No. 9 - Luisi

Closed