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Discussion: Vaughan Williams: Concerto for 2 pianos, A London symphony (1920 version) - Lenehan, McCawley, Yates

Posts: 3

Post by Kal Rubinson September 5, 2015 (1 of 3)
I do not think there is anything deceptive about the fact that the Dutton SACDs are stereo-only. This was pretty clear to me at the original release announcements. There have been many other such releases although they represent a distinct minority.

Frankly, and speaking primarily about reissued/remastered SACD releases, I think it more deceptive to release a multichannel version when the original was recorded in stereo and no additional "mix tracks" exist.

P.S.: I have not heard this, so it is not a criticism or a review of the recording.

Post by wehecht September 5, 2015 (2 of 3)
I bought the previous round of Dutton sacds, Widor, Arnold, Brian, and was surprised and disappointed that they were stereo only. But that's my fault, not Dutton's. The information is readily available, including right here on this site. Sonically that batch is no great shakes, probably no better than ***. I haven't heard this one.

Post by hiredfox September 6, 2015 (3 of 3)
At a time when many SACD labels seem to have thrown in the towel it was good to see Dutton suddenly launch into SACD albeit in stereo only but that is (my hunch) simply because their focus on music and therefore likely previous customer base has been British and in Britain stereo still rules the roost.

It could be the case that they are just dipping a few toes into the water in the cheapest possible way, so presumably if through SACD a more demanding international market suddenly opens up to them and they receive feedback intimating that multi-channel is costing them sales then who knows?

Of course new growth should be stimulated so I have responded to their initiative by buying all of their recent SACD releases. As for the Vaughan Williams disc, the Concerto for two Pianos is an attractive novelty and worth having in any collection whilst the performance of the London Symphony to me is rather good and bearing in mind this is the less often recorded short 1920 version not to be dismissed.

Neither the pianists nor the conductor are in the front rank of even British artists so even with the venerable RSNO chugging away don't expect miracles of orchestral invention and interpretation but decent as opposed to outstanding performances and two rarer works on one disc should be enough to satisfy many.

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