add to wish list | library


5 of 10 recommend this,
would you recommend it?

yes | no

amazon.ca
amazon.co.uk
amazon.com
amazon.de
 
amazon.fr
amazon.it
 
jpc

Discussion: Schoenberg: Gurrelieder - Esa-Pekka Salonen

Posts: 23
Page: 1 2 3 next

Post by sc_ita October 12, 2009 (1 of 23)
Is it possible to know if this interesting SACD proposal is a pure DSD recording?
SC

Post by Claude October 12, 2009 (2 of 23)
The booklet is available on the label website, but it does not list the recording equipment.

You could ask the recording engineer, Jonathan Stokes from Classic Sound Ltd

http://www.classicsound.net/jonathan_stokes.htm

Post by Kal Rubinson October 12, 2009 (3 of 23)
Claude said:

The booklet is available on the label website, but it does not list the recording equipment.

You could ask the recording engineer, Jonathan Stokes from Classic Sound Ltd

http://www.classicsound.net/jonathan_stokes.htm

Strangely, though, the back insert and the outer sleeve also say "24bit Digital Recording" Hmmm.

It is recorded at a pretty low level, at least as compared with the Gielen/Hanssler.

Kal

Post by sc_ita October 14, 2009 (4 of 23)
Well, so a logical conclusion should be that it is an "High-Resolution PCM".
It would be very interesting to read few more comments regarding the
comparison with the Gielen/Hanssler. (If I don't ask too much...)
SC

Post by Kal Rubinson October 14, 2009 (5 of 23)
Not a lot to say yet. I listened to it from beginning to end once but not with full attention. But that was partly because it never really grabbed my attention. I almost wrote it off.

A day or two later, I A/B-ed a few portions with the Gielen and found that (1) I had to pump up the level on the Salonen to get it to open up and (2) that it compared very well, although very different from, the Gielen.

So, more careful extended listening is warranted.

Post by Chris October 15, 2009 (6 of 23)
Kal Rubinson said:

Not a lot to say yet. I listened to it from beginning to end once but not with full attention. But that was partly because it never really grabbed my attention. I almost wrote it off.

A day or two later, I A/B-ed a few portions with the Gielen and found that (1) I had to pump up the level on the Salonen to get it to open up and (2) that it compared very well, although very different from, the Gielen.

So, more careful extended listening is warranted.

If anything, a low recording level should be sign of a realistic dynamic range captured.
IMO one of the real benefits of SACD and hi res.

Keep us posted regarding both sound and performance.

ps. I couldn´t care less whether the master recording was made in DSD or hi res PCM.

But I like the piece and would like to have it on SACD.

Post by sc_ita October 15, 2009 (7 of 23)
... a low recording level should be sign of a realistic dynamic range captured. IMO one of the real benefits of SACD and hi res [...] couldn´t care less whether the master recording was made in DSD or hi res PCM ...
About the low level I totally agree with you.
SACD that came from pure DSD or from Hi-Res PCM are both superb (if well
recorded). This notwithstanding, I prefere to know the precise information
about the type of the original record encoding (tape, DSD, HiResPCM, ...).
Please, consider that I am absolutely not polemical!
I am very interested in the further comments from KR. Thank you for the answer.
SC

Post by mahlerei October 15, 2009 (8 of 23)
Hmm, I'm not sure low-level recordings are beneficial. I often find when I have to crank them up to hear the smaller details the music simply gets too loud. If the engineers do their job properly they will find a good compromise. In fact I hardly ever need to adjust the volume control, except for these rogue discs.

Post by Windsurfer October 15, 2009 (9 of 23)
Roque discs ?

You evidently feel pretty strongly about this!

Your comments provoke a curiosity. Your "User Details" page indicates that you live in the "United Kingdom", which although not so large as the USA, does include a lot of turf. Not knowing where you live in the UK, I wonder if you are in the habit of attending live concerts of music that, like the Shosty 4th for one example gets LOUD!, and when you hear that kind of music, Mahler also comes to mind, mind you mahlerei, do you cringe?

My subscription seat for the Boston Symphony concerts in Symphony Hall, Boston, is in the right hand end, maybe 15 or 20 ft from the wall in the center section of the 2nd Balcony. It is pretty far from the orchestra, maybe 90% of the way back to the rear wall.

The sound that reaches that seat can be astonishingly loud in the Mahler 6th, Shostakovitch 4th, 7th, and 10th symphonies and also Janacek's Sinfonietta , Tara Bulba, and in any work where the full Tanglewood Festival Chorus, sings forte accompanied by large orchestra - Faust going over the precipice in the Berlioz is a good example! I have never experienced a disc that when the correct playback level is used, gets within say, 95% of the loudness I experience in that seat on loud music.

If you enjoy that kind of music in the concert hall, but not at home when playing a disc with realistically wide dynamic range, then something is wrong with your audio system - I am including the room acoustics in this statement.

Now it may be that you are very very happy with your situation and are content to blame the engineers for not making what you feel are appropriate compromises, but for many of us, realistically wide dynamic range is one of SACDs greater attractions. We love those discs you have to "crank up to hear smaller details". The caveat is not to hear THEM louder than you would in the concert hall, for doing so does set the stage for excessive loudness during the crescendos.

FWIW I have found that generally, the MCH layer of a given disc can be played louder without seeming "too loud" than the stereo layer. It is more open and less congested, recreating something more of the sense of scale experienced in the concert hall.

Post by mahlerei October 15, 2009 (10 of 23)
Windsurfer said:

Roque discs ?

You evidently feel pretty strongly about this!

Your comments provoke a curiosity. Your "User Details" page indicates that you live in the "United Kingdom", which although not so large as the USA, does include a lot of turf. Not knowing where you live in the UK, I wonder if you are in the habit of attending live concerts of music that, like the Shosty 4th for one example gets LOUD!, and when you hear that kind of music, Mahler also comes to mind, mind you mahlerei, do you cringe?

My subscription seat for the Boston Symphony concerts in Symphony Hall, Boston, is in the right hand end, maybe 15 or 20 ft from the wall in the center section of the 2nd Balcony. It is pretty far from the orchestra, maybe 90% of the way back to the rear wall.

The sound that reaches that seat can be astonishingly loud in the Mahler 6th, Shostakovitch 4th, 7th, and 10th symphonies and also Janacek's Sinfonietta , Tara Bulba, and in any work where the full Tanglewood Festival Chorus, sings forte accompanied by large orchestra - Faust going over the precipice in the Berlioz is a good example! I have never experienced a disc that when the correct playback level is used, gets within say, 95% of the loudness I experience in that seat on loud music.

If you enjoy that kind of music in the concert hall, but not at home when playing a disc with realistically wide dynamic range, then something is wrong with your audio system - I am including the room acoustics in this statement.

Now it may be that you are very very happy with your situation and are content to blame the engineers for not making what you feel are appropriate compromises, but for many of us, realistically wide dynamic range is one of SACDs greater attractions. We love those discs you have to "crank up to hear smaller details". The caveat is not to hear THEM louder than you would in the concert hall, for doing so does set the stage for excessive loudness during the crescendos.

FWIW I have found that generally, the MCH layer of a given disc can be played louder without seeming "too loud" than the stereo layer. It is more open and less congested, recreating something more of the sense of scale experienced in the concert hall.

Perhaps you should read more carefully it's ROGUE.

I live in London, so yes, concert going is - and has been - a regular part of my life for 30 years now.

What you don't seem to understand - or won't - is that listening in a domestic environment is not the same as listening in a concert hall. That said, I have no problems with loud music per se, what I don't like - in this case - is music that is balanced in such a way that cranking it up makes the loud passages unbearably so. That is just plain uncomfortable for me, though obviously not for you.

Page: 1 2 3 next

Closed