add to wish list | library


25 of 25 recommend this,
would you recommend it?

yes | no

Support this site by purchasing from these vendors using the links provided below. As an Amazon Associate SA-CD.net earns from qualifying purchases.
 
amazon.ca
amazon.co.uk
amazon.com
amazon.de
 
amazon.fr
amazon.it
 
jpc

Discussion: Buxtehude: Membra Jesu Nostri - Netherlands Bach Society

Posts: 6

Post by Peter June 5, 2007 (1 of 6)
Encore une traduction en anglais. The last couple of sentences in particular do need some polishing up.

Please feel free to correct....

Dating back to 1680, the cycle of seven Cantatas “Membra Jesu Nostri” by the composer Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1707) is a work of an undeniable originality, based on non-liturgical texts, forming part of a corpus of the Middle Ages in which is celebrated the passion of Christ. Of hymnic character, "it is an exalted text, mystical, which is presented as seven meditations about the various parts of the body of Christ on the Cross - successively the feet, the knees, the hands, the side, the chest, the heart and the face” explains Pieter Dirksen in the booklet accompanying this recording. But this work goes well beyond the simple anecdotic image which such a “clinical” list can conjure up. Through this new interpretation, open to a new vision of this religious idea, Buxtehude composes a work of rare depth, and delivers splendid vocal harmonies affecting both heart and soul. With The Netherlands Bach Society, Jos van Veldhoven achieves the right tone and reference performance that this admirable score offers us. Through highlighting the expressiveness, his vision imbues the voices of his singers with a quite divine smoothness. The sonority of the singing becomes a theatre for deep and bare meditation, a frame of mind for consolation of humanity.

A superb recording in pure DSD which should be an urgent purchase.

Post by Arthur June 9, 2009 (2 of 6)
There has been so much negative technical talk lately that it seems many of us are forgetting the purpose of this web site: to promote interest in a wonderful format. So I thought I'd take this moment to comment on a disc that has found a special place in my collection!

For me, for 40-plus years, classical music basically began with Bach and moved forward. I'd had a few fine moments with the music of Monteverdi, but Bach was basically it. Over the last 3 or 4 years however, I have started to really gain a greater appreciation of Bach, and with that came curiosity: where did Bach come from. to me Bach was part of a great Baroque expanse that somehow grew out of the music of Monteverdi's time, but if you listened to the two side by side, there was no interconnect. I suppose it is rather like listening to Schoenberg, with no knowledge of what came before, and then hearing Haydn and trying to make the connection. It's a big leap!

Well, for me that was the leap with Bach! But as I got more involved I wanted to know where he came from in a more immediate way. And after doing some reading, I decided to check out Buxtehude. I got the two Trio Sonata discs on Arts, and they were wonderful!

They led me to the Sony/BMG oratorio disc. That one was okay, but not such a revelation. But undeterred, I decided to check out this Channel disc. And for me, if there is one disc this year that has hardly been out of my player for over 24 hours. it's this one. Suddenly Bach falls into context. And on its own, this music is fabulous!

As George Flanagin said in his review: "The entire disc compels you to just sit down and listen. I had intended to listen to each cut separately, press pause, take a few notes for this review, and then move on. That is my usual method in the second listen. By the time cut 3 arrived, I just put down the pad and let it go."

And that really sums it up! If you can only try one new disc next month, make it this one!

Bret

GIVE THIS ONE A LISTEN. IT WILL REPAY YOU FOR YOUR EFFORT!

Post by channel June 9, 2009 (3 of 6)
Arthur said:

There has been so much negative technical talk lately that it seems many of us are forgetting the purpose of this web site: to promote interest in a wonderful format. So I thought I'd take this moment to comment on a disc that has found a special place in my collection!

For me, for 40-plus years, classical music basically began with Bach and moved forward. I'd had a few fine moments with the music of Monteverdi, but Bach was basically it. Over the last 3 or 4 years however, I have started to really gain a greater appreciation of Bach, and with that came curiosity: where did Bach come from. to me Bach was part of a great Baroque expanse that somehow grew out of the music of Monteverdi's time, but if you listened to the two side by side, there was no interconnect. I suppose it is rather like listening to Schoenberg, with no knowledge of what came before, and then hearing Haydn and trying to make the connection. It's a big leap!

Well, for me that was the leap with Bach! But as I got more involved I wanted to know where he came from in a more immediate way. And after doing some reading, I decided to check out Buxtehude. I got the two Trio Sonata discs on Arts, and they were wonderful!

They led me to the Sony/BMG oratorio disc. That one was okay, but not such a revelation. But undeterred, I decided to check out this Channel disc. And for me, if there is one disc this year that has hardly been out of my player for over 24 hours. it's this one. Suddenly Bach falls into context. And on its own, this music is fabulous!

As George Flanagin said in his review: "The entire disc compels you to just sit down and listen. I had intended to listen to each cut separately, press pause, take a few notes for this review, and then move on. That is my usual method in the second listen. By the time cut 3 arrived, I just put down the pad and let it go."

And that really sums it up! If you can only try one new disc next month, make it this one!

Bret

GIVE THIS ONE A LISTEN. IT WILL REPAY YOU FOR YOUR EFFORT!

Dear Bret,
Your kind words about my recording of Buxtehude have made me go back to the shelf and pull down this recording for another listen! It has been a couple of years since hearing this cd and indeed Buxtehude was a great teacher!

jared

Post by canonical June 10, 2009 (4 of 6)
This is indeed an exceptionally fine SACD ... in every sense ... and I have been meaning to add a review of it here.

With regard to the connection to Bach, track 8 contains Buxtehude's version of the chorale:

"Mit Fried und Freud ich fahr dahin"

.... music which I knew from somewhere ... .... .... yes - from Bach.

This marvellously haunting chorale actually stems from Martin Luther ... and after Buxtehude, was then used by Bach in various cantatas, which I have managed to track down ... namely:

BWV 83 (mvmt 5)
BWV 95 (mvmt 1)
BWV 106 (mvmt 3b) Actus Tragicus
BWV 125 (mvmt 1)
BWV 382

That really does make a nice connection between Buxtehude and Bach.

I also recently discovered the music of Reinhard Keiser (1674-1739). His Passion Oratorium is particularly brilliant (Christophorus Label Redbook), and contains within it (no.42) a chorale that, from memory, appears to be the basis for that used by Bach in the St. Matthews Passion. Magnificent CD, if you can track it down.

Post by Arthur June 10, 2009 (5 of 6)
canonical said:

This is indeed an exceptionally fine SACD ... in every sense ... and I have been meaning to add a review of it here.

With regard to the connection to Bach, track 8 contains Buxtehude's version of the chorale:

"Mit Fried und Freud ich fahr dahin"

.... music which I knew from somewhere ... .... .... yes - from Bach.

This marvellously haunting chorale actually stems from Martin Luther ... and after Buxtehude, was then used by Bach in various cantatas, which I have managed to track down ... namely:

BWV 83 (mvmt 5)
BWV 95 (mvmt 1)
BWV 106 (mvmt 3b) Actus Tragicus
BWV 125 (mvmt 1)
BWV 382

That really does make a nice connection between Buxtehude and Bach.

I also recently discovered the music of Reinhard Keiser (1674-1739). His Passion Oratorium is particularly brilliant (Christophorus Label Redbook), and contains within it (no.42) a chorale that, from memory, appears to be the basis for that used by Bach in the St. Matthews Passion. Magnificent CD, if you can track it down.

Thanks for the tip. I'll pull out those cantatas and listen again!

Bret

Post by aoqd22 June 10, 2009 (6 of 6)
Thanks for drawing attention to this disc I placed an order earlier today looking forward to its arrival!

Closed