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Discussion: Mahler: Symphony No. 10 (Adagio), Kindertotenlieder - Bernstein

Posts: 12
Page: 1 2 next

Post by Beagle November 9, 2007 (1 of 12)
I have Baker with Barbirolli and the Halle doing Kindertotenlieder -- and wish THAT recording were being offered in SACD. I'd order this disc for the sake of having Dame Janet in SACD, but I don't trust Bernstein. If anyone has this recording in a previous incarnation (CD, LP...), please comment on the performance.

Post by ramesh November 9, 2007 (2 of 12)
This was my first ever Mahler LP, but I lost it somewhere in my travels. I haven't heard it for perhaps twenty years. What I do remember is that Baker's voice perhaps had a little bit of a 'beat'.
The adagio of Mahler 10 is wonderful- big-boned playing, wonderful high trumpet 'A' at the climax. But it was the Krenek edition, I think.

NB. Who's going to buy the final translated installment of La Grange's Mahler bio? Amazon.com has an AMAZING preorder discount- $140 down to $43!

Post by akiralx November 10, 2007 (3 of 12)
ramesh said:

Who's going to buy the final translated installment of La Grange's Mahler bio? Amazon.com has an AMAZING preorder discount- $140 down to $43!

Aye, though the listing also says the book's dimensions are 0.1 x 0.1 x 0.1 inches, which is a tad worrying...

http://www.amazon.com/Gustav-Mahler-Life-Short-1907-1911/dp/0198163878/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/105-6798783-9271622?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1194682497&sr=8-1

Post by zeus November 10, 2007 (4 of 12)
akiralx said:

Aye, though the listing also says the book's dimensions are 0.1 x 0.1 x 0.1 inches, which is a tad worrying...

It does say "cut short".

Post by Livy November 29, 2007 (5 of 12)
CBS - "Crappy Bassless Sound" - Ramesh, you are an audio-linguistic genius, indeed!

Post by Beagle November 29, 2007 (6 of 12)
ramesh,

Many thanks for an excellent [first impression] review. The deSelby version would be 'Great music, great performances, flawed recording', no? I have one final question for you:

Is Dame Janet's performance 'magical'? Flaws I can handle, but there must be magic.

Post by ramesh November 29, 2007 (7 of 12)
B,
one person's magic is another's Sudanese teddy bear.
The reason I mentioned this was the first LP I had was to hint that I mightn't be purely objective, if this can ever be attained in art-- it's well known that many 'first discs' become templates.

Baker/ Barbirolli are for me, swings and roundabouts, equal to this. DF-D and Ferrier still reign supreme.

Post by Beagle November 30, 2007 (8 of 12)
ramesh said: ...swings and roundabouts...
Translation:
(Baker+Bernstein = Baker+Barbirolli) AND (Baker+X < (Ferrier+X,Dieskau+X))

You refer to Ferrier+Patzak(1952) AND/OR Dieskau+Wunderlich(1964), yes?

For a bit there, I thought you had discovered a Ferrier+Dieskau recording! All of which raises the eternal question: why are so few, if any, monophonic recordings being reissued in surround sound?

(sorry, I've been writing SQL all day)

Post by ramesh November 30, 2007 (9 of 12)
Ferrier-Patzak and Ludwig-Wunderlich are for Das Lied von der Erde.
KIndertotenlieder can either be for male or female voice, although the implied narrator of the poems is male. [ The Third song refers to the child's mother in the third person ]

Bernstein's earlier VPO Das Lied for Decca had Ludwig and King.

I've played part of the Sony SACD of Das Lied, which I've never heard before. Ludwig sounds fine, but the odd balances I noted in the Kindertotenlieder remain. Ensemble is woolly eg final chord of the first song sounds like a Furtwängler 'splotch'. Nasal oboe.

Post by Beagle December 5, 2007 (10 of 12)
Every superman has his kryptonite...

I am reading and very much enjoying psychologist Oliver Sacks' "Musicophilia" and give it a five-out-of-five stars. One thing which this book illustrates very well is the uniqueness of every listener's experience of music, even when all are listening to the same common 'pool' of western civilisation. For Sacks, Mahler is a no-go zone, and waking up in the morning with Kindertotenlieder playing in his head is enough to send him running to HIS shrink. Different folks, different strokes, they say.

RE the picture of Sacks listening to earphones: it was the photographer's idea. Sacks dislikes 'phones and utterly hates iPods -- plus he thinks "compulsory listening" e.g. to music in restaurants etc should be illegal.

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