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Discussion: Bruckner: Symphony No. 7 - Kreizberg

Posts: 25
Page: 1 2 3 next

Post by viktor June 17, 2005 (1 of 25)
I can report that the Kreizberg recording of Bruckner 7 is a major event. It´s a large scale performance with quite slow tempi in first two movements. Kreizberg is a master builder and shapes these blocks with the hand of an architect. The playing itself is incredibly beautiful with warm, full string sonority. Not the febrile quality we are used to from Karajans´ Berlin recordings. Warmer and smoother in a positive way. The brass is rich and full. The recorded balance is the best ever given to a Bruckner symphony. So put this on your wish list and I will return with a review in due course. Timings are: 21.42, 23.08, 9.59, 12.41.

Post by mdt June 18, 2005 (2 of 25)
viktor said:

I can report that the Kreizberg recording of Bruckner 7 is a major event. It´s a large scale performance with quite slow tempi in first two movements. Kreizberg is a master builder and shapes these blocks with the hand of an architect. The playing itself is incredibly beautiful with warm, full string sonority. Not the febrile quality we are used to from Karajans´ Berlin recordings. Warmer and smoother in a positive way. The brass is rich and full. The recorded balance is the best ever given to a Bruckner symphony. So put this on your wish list and I will return with a review in due course. Timings are: 21.42, 23.08, 9.59, 12.41.

If you like Pentatone's Sound on Bruckner, try Haitinks recording of Bruckner 8, it was also made by Polyhymnia, the company that does all the recording for Pentatone and in the famed Concertgebouw to top it off.

Post by viktor June 18, 2005 (3 of 25)
I did actually and was a bit disappointed. If you look up my review of the recording you will find out why. Thank you for the recommendation though. v.

Post by Daland June 18, 2005 (4 of 25)
viktor said:

I did actually and was a bit disappointed. If you look up my review of the recording you will find out why. Thank you for the recommendation though. v.

I fully agree with your review. You were not sure about the date of Haitink's first recording of Bruckner's Eighth. According to several sources, including the Bruckner discography edited by John F. Berky, it was made on Sept. 1-3, 1969.

Post by tailspn June 18, 2005 (5 of 25)
Myself, I like maestro Haitink. Iíve probably heard him both perform with, and rehearse the Boston Symphony Orchestra more than thirty times in as many years. The orchestraís enthusiasm and output for him is always robust. Itís always an event when he comes to town.

Aside from my personal appreciation of both the man, and his performances, the Polyhymnia recorded RCO Bruckner 8, IMO, is one of the best recorded, most realistic SA-CD issues to date. On full range electrostatic speakers in Mch, the sense of actually being ten feet in front of the orchestra in nothing short of stunning. Rarely, if ever, is the harmonic complexity, that unmistakable spacious woody gutty detail and warmth of massed strings captured as in this recording. This Bruckner bares no resemblance to the previous RCO releases Iíve heard, which were not recorded by Polyhymnia. It is truly a sonic landmark. Highly recommended if youíre interested in a large orchestra reference SA-CD.

Just my 2 cents
Tom

Post by toddao June 18, 2005 (6 of 25)
tailspn said:

Myself, I like maestro Haitink. Iíve probably heard him both perform with, and rehearse the Boston Symphony Orchestra more than thirty times in as many years. The orchestraís enthusiasm and output for him is always robust. Itís always an event when he comes to town.

Aside from my personal appreciation of both the man, and his performances, the Polyhymnia recorded RCO Bruckner 8, IMO, is one of the best recorded, most realistic SA-CD issues to date. On full range electrostatic speakers in Mch, the sense of actually being ten feet in front of the orchestra in nothing short of stunning. Rarely, if ever, is the harmonic complexity, that unmistakable woody gutty detail and warmth of massed strings captured as in this recording. This Bruckner bares no resemblance to the previous RCO releases Iíve heard, which were not recorded by Polyhymnia. It is truly a sonic landmark. Highly recommended if youíre interested in a large orchestra reference SA-CD.

Just my 2 cents
Tom

Do you know what version is used?

Post by Peter June 19, 2005 (7 of 25)
Daland said:

I fully agree with your review. You were not sure about the date of Haitink's first recording of Bruckner's Eighth. According to several sources, including the Bruckner discography edited by John F. Berky, it was made on Sept. 1-3, 1969.

Info from Decca/Philips:

Bernard Haitink has been acclaimed as one of the great Bruckner and Mahler interpreters of the second half of the twentieth century and during his tenure as chief conductor of Amsterdam's Concertgebouw Orchestra he recorded complete cycles of symphonies by both composers. Haitink's Bruckner cycle commenced with Symphony No.8 in September 1960 and over a twelve year period he recorded Symphonies 0-9. He completed this cycle in May 1972 with Symphony No.1 (in the Linz version). This highly-acclaimed cycle makes a welcome return to the catalogue.

Post by viktor June 19, 2005 (8 of 25)
The info from Philips is wrong. Symphony no 8 was recorded in 1969 as explained above.

Post by mdt June 19, 2005 (9 of 25)
toddao said:

Do you know what version is used?

the Robert Haas edition

Post by tailspn June 19, 2005 (10 of 25)
mdt said:

the Robert Haas edition

I agree. But I cannot find a direct reference on the RCO jacket, or booklet as to the version edition. There is, in the booklet text, written by Aad van der Ven, a hint of sorts....

..."Robert Haas, a musicologist who prepared an edition of the Eighth in the 1930s that was based upon the 1892 version but which restored various passages to the Adagio and the Finale from the 1887 version. His underlining and totally speculative intention seems to have been that this is what Bruckner himself would have done if he had carried out his improvements without having been instructed what to change by his friends who wished to help him. .... Mengelbergís successor Edward van Beinum (Concertgebouw Orchestra conductors) went over to the Haas edition, which has always been the edition preferred by Bernard Haitink."

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