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Discussion: American Mavericks - Michael Tilson Thomas

Posts: 22
Page: 1 2 3 next

Post by Vaan October 31, 2012 (1 of 22)
For those of you who are allergic to applause on disc I can inform that all pieces here include them. I find the applause very intrusive as they appear even before the music has died down. Enthusiasm is a good thing, but I wasn´t there and my listening room is no concert hall.

Post by Iain October 31, 2012 (2 of 22)
I believe you will find most SF symphony releases have audience applause as this one has it as well:
Adams: Harmonielehre, Short Ride in a Fast Machine - Michael Tilson Thomas

Good performance, but applause detracts from overall quality of release. Quite odd, IMO.

Post by tream October 31, 2012 (3 of 22)
Iain said:

I believe you will find most SF symphony releases have audience applause as this one has it as well:
Adams: Harmonielehre, Short Ride in a Fast Machine - Michael Tilson Thomas

Good performance, but applause detracts from overall quality of release. Quite odd, IMO.

The Mahler series does not have applause, but since then the releases all have applause. I don't understand why the decision was made to do this, but it is unfortunate, IMO.

Post by mpdonahue November 6, 2012 (4 of 22)
There is a very simple explanation.
The Mahler series was recorded live in concert but a patch session was used to record starts and stops as well as fix material that was not covered in the concerts.
All the records since then have been recorded live without a patch session, so all the last notes have applause that can not be eliminated.
It's a simple case of economics. The patch session costs either $15,000 or $30,000 (depending on length)for a record that will probably move 3-5000 units. You do the math.
All the best,
-mark

Post by Claude November 6, 2012 (5 of 22)
Thanks for the explanation.

Instead of these costly patch sessions, couldn't they (preferably the conductor himself just before the performance) have explained that they are recording and asked the audience to wait with the applause until 5 seconds after the last note?

Most orchestral releases are now live recordings, and the majority of them is without applause. Do they all use patch sessions?

Post by Polly Nomial November 6, 2012 (6 of 22)
Claude said:

Instead of these costly patch sessions, couldn't they (preferably the conductor himself just before the performance) have explained that they are recording and asked the audience to wait with the applause until 5 seconds after the last note?

Most orchestral releases are now live recordings, and the majority of them is without applause. Do they all use patch sessions?

I think LSO Live are all patched (hence applause free). Not all others are & that is why applause appears.

Personally, I think if an event is being documented (as opposed to creating a recording), then the audience reaction (no matter how long or short a pause they choose to give) should be included. Also, if I were a subscriber of that orchestra's concert series, I'm not sure I'd want to be told to "hold back" at the end of (say) Tchaikovsky's 4th symphony! That said, (still) the most memorable performance I've seen to date had the audience holding its collective breath for about 1 minute - it seemed like an eternity at the time.

Where I've been lucky enough to have been present at some recording-from-concert sessions and heard the performances again I am so grateful that the reaction I was part of is recreated & I miss it greatly when it's omitted. I know other people feel very differently but that's my 2p.

Post by seth November 6, 2012 (7 of 22)
Polly Nomial said:

Personally, I think if an event is being documented (as opposed to creating a recording), then the audience reaction (no matter how long or short a pause they choose to give) should be included. Also, if I were a subscriber of that orchestra's concert series, I'm not sure I'd want to be told to "hold back" at the end of (say) Tchaikovsky's 4th symphony! That said, (still) the most memorable performance I've seen to date had the audience holding its collective breath for about 1 minute - it seemed like an eternity at the time.

Agreed. You don't want the fact that the concert is being recorded to alter the experience for the concertgoers.

I've been to performances where the conductor has gone as far as to explain how sensitive the microphones are and that they can pickup the pages of the program notes being turned in the first few rows. I'm sure the folks in those seats felt like they were sitting on egg shells for the whole concert.

Post by Windsurfer November 6, 2012 (8 of 22)
Vaan said:

For those of you who are allergic to applause on disc I can inform that all pieces here include them. I find the applause very intrusive as they appear even before the music has died down.

I find this a BIG problem with audiences these days. They respect neither the performers nor the music. Recorded applause does not bother me when there is a suitable silence between the end of the last sound dying away and the beginning of applause.

Post by mpdonahue November 7, 2012 (9 of 22)
Polly Nomial said:
I think LSO Live are all patched (hence applause free). Not all others are & that is why applause appears.

The LSO are recorded under a different set of rules. AFAIK, all the rehearsals are recorded along with a 1 or 2 concerts of a particular program. This is the same way that Mariinsky is recorded.
All the best,
-mark

Post by hiredfox November 8, 2012 (10 of 22)
Windsurfer said:

I find this a BIG problem with audiences these days. They respect neither the performers nor the music. Recorded applause does not bother me when there is a suitable silence between the end of the last sound dying away and the beginning of applause.

Indeed, it seems these days that every audience has at least one attention-grabbing shouter, usually a youngish middle aged trendy type (always) male, probably attending a first ever concert series having "been a 'fan' all his life" - as John Lennon might have observed....

It's getting worse too as classical music reaches the hinterland of the great unwashed masses, end of movement applauding being the latest sign of conspicuous expression of inwards emotions. Two weeks ago at the RFH, London no less - Andrew Litton's concert - the pianist was applauded at the end of the first movement of PC1... With great irony she looked in that direction and said "Thank you for that!" in that deep sultry tone that only waspish young Russian ladies can muster.

I am on record here for the past 50 years (or so it seems) as a lover of on-disc applause, it stops all those lonesome feelings of having nobody with whom to share those pleasures of the moment!

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